As the Seasons Change, So do the Menus

Many restaurants throughout the country and even the world change their menus to accommodate the magical fall flavors.  Root Vegetables, warm spices, and hearty stacks all scream “fall is...
fallfood

Many restaurants throughout the country and even the world change their menus to accommodate the magical fall flavors.  Root Vegetables, warm spices, and hearty stacks all scream “fall is here.”  To prepare for the change many chefs turn to local, seasonal produce, yummy! At the Ava Restaurant and Wine Bar in Virginia, the chef discusses the menu decisions that reflect the bounty of fall flavors.  Erik Curren wrote of his ideas, “Pumpkins. Butternut squash. Brussels sprouts and cabbage! Apples, glorious Virginia apples. Chicories and chard and root vegetables like carrots, beets, turnips, parsnips. And the herbs — fennel bulb and garlic and Rosemary. I can taste now the ripening of fall cauliflower and the subtle flavor of kohlrabi. Is it any wonder I feel the urge to nestle down with a pile of cookbooks and my recipe collection, to scan my mind over historical Virginia cooking and its southern comforts, and come up with a list of dishes so bursting with autumn’s glory that I can hardly contain myself?  I agree with you Erik, I can hardly contain myself either.

http://avarestaurantwinebar.com/2014/08/changing-seasons/

Eirk isn’t the only chef feeling the fall change.  According to Nation’s Restaurant News, many chefs are changing their menus, specifically their seafood menus to include a variety of autumn produce and cooking techniques.  The wrote of Santa Monica’s At Catch American Seafood, “one of the five eateries Mede oversees as managing chef for By the Blue Sea Restaurants in Santa Monica, Calif., about 50 percent of the menu will change each season. Among the main dishes on deck for autumn are prawns that get a winter campfire-like smokiness from being cooked on cedar paper; local shellfish with miso broth; and cornmeal-crusted Rainbow Trout. “From a technique point of view, it’s about moving away from grilling and searing,” said Mede. “It’s more about [preparations like] crusting.” Mede plans to pair the autumn dishes with all types of squash and pumpkins, and whatever else he finds at the local farmer’s market.”

http://nrn.com/seafood-trends/look-autumn-seafood-menus

So the next time you are thinking of going out for a nice meal on a cold autumn evening, think about trying a fall menu.  I promise the fall flavors will not disappoint and fresh ingredients just add to the experience.

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