I Go To The Woods For Mine

Now, I grew up in Idaho and people hunt for their food there.  If you can’t go hunting for a turkey, there are great options for a free range,...
Scared cartoon turkey. Vector clip art illustration with simple gradients. Elements on separate layers.

Now, I grew up in Idaho and people hunt for their food there.  If you can’t go hunting for a turkey, there are great options for a free range, organic turkey.  There are so many benefits to buying an organic turkey this year. Consumer Reports gave incredible reasons wjhy organic truly is the way to go.  The reported, “Here’s one more reason to consider going organic: Turkeys labeled organic are raised without antibiotics, and the overuse of those drugs in raising farm animals is causing big problems in humans.  About 80 percent of the antibiotics sold in the U.S. are used in industrially produced livestock. Producers administer the drugs to promote growth and prevent animals from getting sick on crowded factory farms. But the widespread use of antibiotics in farmed animals breeds drug-resistant bacteria that can spread from farms to humans through contaminated food, airborne dust blowing off farms, and water and soil polluted with contaminated feces.”

http://www.consumerreports.org/food/why-you-should-buy-an-organic-turkey

If you are having a hard time understanding what the labels mean on the turkeys at the store, here is a very through outline of what to look for in your turkey.  The Grand Island Independent did an amazing job saying” Free-range: This is a legal definition that requires that the birds be raised having access to the outdoors. There’s a bit of wiggle room. They don’t necessarily need to have access to pasture or grass, just the outdoors, which can mean dirt or gravel.

Fresh: Legally, it means that a turkey has not been chilled below 26 degrees. Practically speaking, though, a 26-degree turkey is still about as soft as a bowling ball.

Frozen: This means that the turkey has been chilled to 0 degrees. It should be noted that this doesn’t necessarily mean an inferior bird. Properly frozen, stored and defrosted, it can be excellent.

Hard- or deep-chilled: An intermediate step that means the turkey has been chilled to between 0 and 26 degrees.

Hen: This is a female bird and they usually come in at less than 16 pounds.

Heritage: This is probably the hottest category among food lovers, but it is not legally regulated. Basically, it means anything but the standard turkey breed, which is the Broad-Breasted White. Heritage birds tend to be leaner, with less meat, which means they won’t feed as many people and will dry out if not cooked carefully. They also have a gamier flavor, which is appreciated by some but not everyone.

Kosher: Turkeys that have been slaughtered and cleaned in accordance with kosher law. Note that while they have been briefly salted to draw out any remaining blood, this is not the same as brining. There is lots of confusion about this, but koshering requires salting for only one hour before rinsing, which is not at all the same as brining for several days.

Natural: Basically no added ingredients and only minimal processing — no injecting flavors or brining.

Organic: Turkeys that have been raised without hormones and steroids and have been processed without preservatives. In addition they have been fed only organic feed and have ready access to the outdoors.

Pastured: This is a new, nonregulated definition that is kind of like free-range-plus, as the birds have had access to grass.

Self-basting: These are the familiar supermarket turkeys that have been injected with flavor solution or brine to keep them from drying out.

Tom: This is a male turkey, which usually means it weighs more than 18 pounds.”

http://www.theindependent.com/life/food/fresh-frozen-organic-natural-a-guide-to-thanksgiving-turkey-labeling/article_dfc4e2bc-8d88-11e5-a6c4-8773872e1f9b.html

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